Big Heads

Fountain pen and water-soluble crayon

Fountain pen and water-soluble crayon

I am now two weeks in to #sketchbookskool #stretching class. Great to be back in class again! The time is already flying by. This second week I skipped over the blind contour and went straight to drawing big heads. It’s harder than one would think! I need to try this assignment again with a live subject. Reggie the boxer was hanging out at Java Joe’s coffee shop in Sugarloaf, he was a great looking guy–so I snapped his photo. The drawing is kind of wonky and I think that I will re-do his tag, but he was super fun to draw.

The think I like most about this assignment was the feeling of freedom from changing the proportions. Figures can be so intimidating…and changing proportions somehow takes some of the fear out of the drawing.

Winged Creatures

Sepia Pitt Pen, Water-soluble Crayon, White Sharpie

Sepia Pitt Pen, Water-soluble Crayon, White Sharpie

I think I have found a use for the white Sharpie that has been so frustrating for me to use! Wings! I kind of stumbled onto this subject matter…I don’t really like winged ants…but I thought the shapes were fun and the wings were pretty. The sharpie seemed to work well on top of the water-soluble crayon background on my tinted strathmore paper. Maybe I have found my next encaustic series! Winged creatures! It’s just about time to get back to the wax.

So, my plan is to do a bunch of these winged creature sketches that will turn into encaustic panels. Hopefully I can make that work out.

Second in a series

Single Daffodil. 5x7 cradled panel.

Single Daffodil. 5×7 cradled panel.

Sketch to painting. Imaginary color. Water-soluble crayon over absorbent ground–not sure about that choice. The background laid down very nice, but this is a difficult choice of medium. I think that I will try this one again with Casein. I like the softer background of the tulip, I think prefer a little less chaotic. But, all in all, an interesting experiment. I am working on achieving a series of paintings that will all work together–regardless of the medium chosen.

Fountain pen sketch for painting

Fountain pen sketch for painting

First in a series

Orange Tulip

Orange Tulip

Sketch to painting. Imaginary color. Experimental background. Sometimes I wonder…what in the world am I doing? I just launch into a painting using materials that I have either never used or have limited use in…I feel like I should be using materials that I am really adept at. However, I don’t even know what that would be. Painting doesn’t really come naturally to me, so I am approaching it like a drawing.

I had a lot of fun deciding on the colors to use for this piece. I really enjoyed doing the ink only sketch and then re-interpreting that into a small painting. This is 5″x7″ on a cradled birch panel. I really like opaque watercolor and water-soluble crayon, but I wanted to work on something other than paper. So, I found some absorbent gesso ground and made that my first layer, (purposely painted on in several layers with some nice texture) then I did an abstract opaque watercolor background and added some salt. Then I painted my image right on top. I am happy with the translucency almost tissue paper look to it. I am like┬áthat some of the background comes through in the flower. Opaque watercolor is a challenge though and some areas seem muddy to me.

I think that I will try inktense or maybe casein next.

Tulip Study: fountain pen, black ink

Tulip Study: fountain pen, black ink

Quick Sketches

Sharpie in Ink Only Journal

Sharpie in Ink Only Journal

Sometimes a sketch just comes at you in a surprising way. My Mom posted this sweet photo of a newly born lamb, and I immediately thought–so cute I want to draw him! And now, because I am drawing so much, all my supplies are readily at hand. I picked up my ink only journal and a sharpie and did the sketch. What a joy, fun and quick. A happy drawing. I think that is a good goal, to draw as many subjects as I can that really make me happy.

Inspired by one of the #sketchbookskool email assignments I decided to get a Strathmore tinted paper book. The first couple of pages are just experimenting with different mediums to see what works best. I have discovered that that oil based white sharpie I bought has some limitations–the paper just sucks it in, so it really doesn’t show up well. I have a feeling this paper will do best with colored pencil, conte crayon, things like that. The stock is not heavy enough to support too much wet media. It’s one of the largest sketch books I have ever used at 9″x12″–so that will be a good challenge to work a little larger.

This should be a busy week. I have some concentrated time off work and several days in a row–5 big ones, that will be devoted to drawing and painting. Really excited about that!

Colored pencil and white sharpie

Colored pencil and white sharpie

Thinking Spring

Opaque watercolor and colored pencil

Opaque watercolor and colored pencil

I actually saw a robin in the yard today! Spring can’t be too far away. I think I am going to take a break from the daffodil’s now. I won’t see my own blooming for at least another 6 weeks, I will get back to them once I see them in my own yard. Trying to keep the tulips simple, just a little color and a little ink brush pen. Looking forward to filling up my flower only journal with nice variety. of flowers drawn from life.

Inktense and small brush pitt pen

Inktense and small brush pitt pen

We had snow this Easter Sunday! No accumulation, but some heavy snow squalls.

quick Easter bunny sketch: ink only journal

quick Easter bunny sketch: ink only journal

Daffodil’s

Opaque watercolor and colored pencil

Opaque watercolor and colored pencil

I have to admit, I love daffodil’s. However, I find them one of the most challenging flowers to draw. From the front, from the back, from the side, it doesn’t matter…they are hard to capture. Easier to paint than to draw I think. I am working on daffodil’s only because a friend mentioned that these were truly her favorite flower. I was happy to give her the tulip drawing, but after hearing her story of why she loves daffodil’s I felt I had to try the daffodil’s. It may be awhile before I feel like I am doing them justice. A good challenge.

Daffodil Shadows: opaque watercolor and colored pencil

Daffodil Shadows: opaque watercolor and colored pencil